Planning the Upper Lands: Creating a sustainable urban community in Cypress Village and protecting lands in Eagleridge

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Planning the Upper Lands: Creating a sustainable urban community in Cypress Village and protecting lands in Eagleridge


We acknowledge that we are on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Squamish Nation, Tsleil-Waututh Nation and Musqueam Nation. We recognize and respect them as nations in this territory, as well as their historic connection to the lands and waters around us since time immemorial.

Planning the Upper Lands

Building on the vision already outlined in the 2018 Official Community Plan, the District is undertaking a planning and community engagement process to create detailed policy for a new compact, sustainable urban community in Cypress Village and for protecting a large portion of the Eagleridge lands in perpetuity for conservation and recreation.


July 2022 update

Thank you to everyone who provided input during the Phase 3 engagement for Planning the Upper Lands: Creating a Sustainable Urban Community in Cypress Village and Protecting Lands in Eagleridge. A summary of the Phase 3 engagement is now available.

Phase 3 Engagement Summary Report

The next step in this process is for the planning team to finalize a package of proposed bylaws related to Cypress Village and Eagleridge to bring forward for Council’s formal consideration of adoption. We anticipate bringing the bylaws package forward in the fall.


Phase 3 (April 25, 2022)

Drawing on the planning work and community/stakeholder engagement from Phases 1 and 2, Phase 3 involved documenting the proposed plan and associated bylaws for consideration of formal adoption by Council. The bylaws will include:

  • An Area Development Plan for Cypress Village and Eagleridge. The plan will set out policies to guide the development of Cypress Village over the next 20 to 25 years and policies to protect lands in Eagleridge for recreation and conservation purposes.
  • New comprehensive development zoning for Cypress Village.
  • A phased development agreement between the District and the developer, British Pacific Properties Limited (BPP). This agreement will set out the development phasing and the provision of community amenities in Cypress Village as well as the legal mechanisms for protecting the lands in Eagleridge that are currently owned by BPP.
  • Supporting bylaws (such as a park dedication bylaw and OCP amendments bylaw).

Given the high level of interest from the community and stakeholders in planning for Cypress Village and Eagleridge, prior to the introduction of bylaws and the public hearing process, we are providing an opportunity for community and stakeholder engagement.

The purpose of the Phase 3 engagement was to allow the community and stakeholders to review the draft Area Development Plan and ask questions, before it is presented as part of a package of bylaws for Council’s consideration. The question form was open until 4 p.m. on Friday, May 20, 2022.

Five new documents are posted at the links below:

  1. The Draft Area Development Plan for Cypress Village and Eagleridge
  2. A summary of where we are in the process
  3. An overview of what we heard in Phases 1 and 2 and how that has helped shape the Draft Plan
  4. A document with answers to anticipated questions (Phase 3 FAQs)
  5. Summary information about traffic

Virtual information meetings

Virtual information meetings were held on May 17 and 18. There was a 20-minute presentation followed by a question and answer period.

Watch a video of the presentation

Read a summary of the Q&A

Pop up information booths in person

Pop up information booths were held at Spring Fest West (May 7), West Vancouver Memorial Library (May 10), West Vancouver Community Centre (May 11), and the Cypress Pop-Up Village (May 12).

Planning the Upper Lands: Creating a sustainable urban community in Cypress Village and protecting lands in Eagleridge


We acknowledge that we are on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Squamish Nation, Tsleil-Waututh Nation and Musqueam Nation. We recognize and respect them as nations in this territory, as well as their historic connection to the lands and waters around us since time immemorial.

Planning the Upper Lands

Building on the vision already outlined in the 2018 Official Community Plan, the District is undertaking a planning and community engagement process to create detailed policy for a new compact, sustainable urban community in Cypress Village and for protecting a large portion of the Eagleridge lands in perpetuity for conservation and recreation.


July 2022 update

Thank you to everyone who provided input during the Phase 3 engagement for Planning the Upper Lands: Creating a Sustainable Urban Community in Cypress Village and Protecting Lands in Eagleridge. A summary of the Phase 3 engagement is now available.

Phase 3 Engagement Summary Report

The next step in this process is for the planning team to finalize a package of proposed bylaws related to Cypress Village and Eagleridge to bring forward for Council’s formal consideration of adoption. We anticipate bringing the bylaws package forward in the fall.


Phase 3 (April 25, 2022)

Drawing on the planning work and community/stakeholder engagement from Phases 1 and 2, Phase 3 involved documenting the proposed plan and associated bylaws for consideration of formal adoption by Council. The bylaws will include:

  • An Area Development Plan for Cypress Village and Eagleridge. The plan will set out policies to guide the development of Cypress Village over the next 20 to 25 years and policies to protect lands in Eagleridge for recreation and conservation purposes.
  • New comprehensive development zoning for Cypress Village.
  • A phased development agreement between the District and the developer, British Pacific Properties Limited (BPP). This agreement will set out the development phasing and the provision of community amenities in Cypress Village as well as the legal mechanisms for protecting the lands in Eagleridge that are currently owned by BPP.
  • Supporting bylaws (such as a park dedication bylaw and OCP amendments bylaw).

Given the high level of interest from the community and stakeholders in planning for Cypress Village and Eagleridge, prior to the introduction of bylaws and the public hearing process, we are providing an opportunity for community and stakeholder engagement.

The purpose of the Phase 3 engagement was to allow the community and stakeholders to review the draft Area Development Plan and ask questions, before it is presented as part of a package of bylaws for Council’s consideration. The question form was open until 4 p.m. on Friday, May 20, 2022.

Five new documents are posted at the links below:

  1. The Draft Area Development Plan for Cypress Village and Eagleridge
  2. A summary of where we are in the process
  3. An overview of what we heard in Phases 1 and 2 and how that has helped shape the Draft Plan
  4. A document with answers to anticipated questions (Phase 3 FAQs)
  5. Summary information about traffic

Virtual information meetings

Virtual information meetings were held on May 17 and 18. There was a 20-minute presentation followed by a question and answer period.

Watch a video of the presentation

Read a summary of the Q&A

Pop up information booths in person

Pop up information booths were held at Spring Fest West (May 7), West Vancouver Memorial Library (May 10), West Vancouver Community Centre (May 11), and the Cypress Pop-Up Village (May 12).

CLOSED: This form is now closed.

Thank you to everyone who took the time to review the Draft Area Development Plan for Cypress Village and Eagleridge and post questions. This form is now closed. 

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    Let's face it, until WV residents, especially those living outside of the Ambleside core, get door to door bus service, we're not getting out of our cars. Ask yourselves, what's the percentage of Ambleside/Dundarave Village employees who bus it to work? Indeed, how many District employees (at District Hall, police, and fire) bus it to work even though it's less than a 5 minute walk from Marine Drive? I'm not finding anything concrete in your Summary Information About Traffic report that Cypress Village residents and/or visitors to the area will behave any differently. Furthermore, if Cypress Village/Eagleridge recreation, shopping, and employment area become as popular as you claim, what do we get - more traffic! It will only further strain the Taylor Way/Marine Drive intersection with visitors/employees either passing through on way to the Upper Lands or parking at Park Royal and bussing it. Questions: 1) You've included one table to compare trips during morning peak. Why haven't you used the busiest period, which we all know is 3PM to 6PM every day of the week? 2) Furthermore, it's inconceivable that this development for estimated 6,900 residents will increase commute times by only 7 to 9 minutes on top of what we experience today. Sure, we will be dealing with more and more through traffic too so, before even considering a project of this magnitude, why isn't WV joining other NV local governments, and with BPP's influence, to get working now with BC government, on fixing the 2 bottlenecks (LG and 2nd Narrows bridges)? 3) What thought has been given to WV being a non-stop building site for 20 to 25 years and all the extra traffic headache that this will cause the residents of WV during this time?

    WV4Ever asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your comments and questions. In response to your first question, the peak hour times for the Traffic Impact Assessment were established with several criteria in mind: the hours with the highest overall volumes during the morning and evening data collection time periods, the hours that reflect anticipated future Cypress Village peak hours, and hours that are consistent with the Regional Transportation Model. This was discussed with, and approved by, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure, who has an interest in the analysis due to the proximity of the planned development to Highway 1 and Cypress Bowl Road which are under its jurisdiction. The table in the Phase 3 document about traffic information shows in the impacts for the morning peak hour as an illustration of the analysis. The analysis also includes the evening peak, for which the findings are similar. The Traffic Impact Assessment report will be provided as a reference document as part of the package of information materials that will accompany the bylaws when brought forward for Council’s formal consideration of adoption, so there will be an opportunity to review the data and analysis at that time.

    In response to your second question, the estimated impacts on travel times from West Vancouver to different locations in the region with the mixed-use Cypress Village takes into account many factors that will help mitigate traffic impacts (e.g. provision of transit service, transportation network improvements in Cypress Village, and the provision of amenities such as commercial space, a school, and other community facilities in the village). These are explained in the text under the headings “Background” and “Traffic Impact Assessment” in the Phase 3 document summarizing information about traffic, and also in the answer to Question 23 in the Phase 3 FAQs. As noted in the text under the heading “Ongoing Regional Initiatives” in the Phase 3 document summarizing information about traffic, West Vancouver is part of North Shore Connects (a partnership including the three North Shore municipalities, Squamish Nation, and Tsleil-Waututh Nation) which is working together to improve transportation on, to, and from the North Shore. 

    In response to your third question, the Draft Plan anticipates that the village will be built out in phases over about 20 to 25 years and that development will generally have an east to west progression within the village. The developer will be required to have a traffic management plan in place for each application (see information about traffic management plan requirements online here). The Draft Plan includes requirements for some of the important community-building elements (e.g. commercial space such as the grocery store) and the independent transit service to be provided in early phases of the development, to help reduce the need for vehicular trips outside of the community. While it is true that development in Cypress Village will occur over 20 to 25 years, this is not literally turning West Vancouver into a “non-stop building site”. Keep in mind that Cypress Village is not adjacent to most other neighbourhoods in West Vancouver so few places will experience direct impacts of construction activity. Also, West Vancouver as a whole, like all communities in the region, will grow whether or not Cypress Village is developed so there will always be some degree of construction activity.

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    Your reports contain lots of what you believe to be the positives but is not balanced by providing us residents with any of the negatives. This concerns me greatly. Without being honest about the downsides, and justifying your statements, and substantiating with costs, the reports come across as speculative and empty. Questions: 1) BPP would not be entering this deal with WV unless they had much to gain and, from the information you have provided, it seems they will be receiving much more than what they will be giving up. WV can do much better. BPP are not likely to develop much of their lands anyway. The days of huge lots and houses are over (or the potential market so limited) and they know it. Why haven't you provided us the dollars so as to better understand and give the full picture of the money involved in this deal and does the deal need to be updated now that we've had 2 years of crazy real estate gains. 2) Somehow, I think WV residents will end up paying more taxes for more staff and admin to support all this new infrastructure, firehall, school, community centre, etc. Adding the relatively few to the tax base will not be sufficient to justify this development. When will we be told the full impact on our taxes? 3) How can we trust Council and the District that Eagleridge will forever remain dedicated as a park? Just look at Ambleside Park and how our current Mayor would like to destroy some of its acreage by building an Arts Facility there if she has her way. If Ambleside Park can be stolen at the whim of a Mayor then how can any of our parks ever be safe.

    WV4Ever asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your comments and questions. In response to your first question, as described in Section 7.0 of the Draft Plan and as has been communicated throughout the planning process, the fundamental financial basis for the transfer of development potential and rezoning to allow a mixed-use Cypress Village is that the value of BPP’s lands in Cypress Village after rezoning to allow a mixed-use village should approximately match the value of BPP’s lands in Eagleridge and Cypress Village under the existing single-family zoning.  See Question 15 of the Phase 3 FAQs for more detail about how the transfer of development potential financial analysis works. As noted, the comprehensive financial analysis involves estimating the land value supported by redevelopment in Eagleridge and Cypress Village under the existing single-family zoning, the land value supported by development under rezoning to allow a mixed-use Cypress Village, and then calibrating/negotiating the amount of density, the mix of amenities, and other mechanisms to try to balance the land values under the two scenarios. This financial analysis has been completed by independent experts and reviewed by other independent consultants. Because some of the information about BPP’s business plans is confidential, the full financial analysis is not publicly available. 

    With regard to your comment about possible negative impacts on the broader community, the planning work has considered these aspects of the project:

    • Financial: A financial impact analysis is being finalized and will be included in the supporting package of materials made available when the bylaws are brought forward for Council’s formal consideration of adoption. As noted on page 79 of the Draft Area Development Plan for Cypress Village and Eagleridge, Cypress Village will not have any significant positive or negative financial impact on the taxes and fees paid by other residents and taxpayers in West Vancouver.
    • Traffic: As noted in the documents related to traffic provided on the project webpage, there will be some negative impact on travel times, but these are relatively minor.
    • Views: View analysis indicates that some of the taller buildings in Cypress Village will be visible from some viewpoints in the community.

    In response to your third question, BPP will be required to transfer title of its lands in Eagleridge to the District as part of this process and the lands will be dedicated by bylaw as Park.

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    Your reports are peppered with the term "affordable housing" but nowhere do you explain exactly what that means. Since the 1960's, WV has never been affordable. It never will be. Even new condos here will cost you $1.5 million. Rents are sky high too. We all know when it comes to real estate, it's all about Location, Location, Location and WV has it hands down. NV used to be our poor cousin but it too is becoming more and more unaffordable as new builds replace the aging. Questions: 1) What is your definition of affordable housing at Cypress Village - both in terms of price of a home and renting a home? 2) For the affordable rentals, what is the income range currently for a single person and for a couple to qualify for the units you are proposing?

    WV4Ever asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your comments and questions. Housing affordability is addressed in several ways in the Draft Area Development Plan:

    1. Approximately 94% of the housing units in Cypress Village will be apartments or townhouses. While it is true that prices for these kinds of units are typically higher in West Vancouver than in other parts of the region, they are more affordable than single family houses in West Vancouver. For example, as noted in the answer to Question 2 in the Phase 3 FAQs (see point 2b), looking at the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver’s MLS Home Price Index as of January 2022, the benchmark price for an apartment unit in West Vancouver was 35% of the price of a single family house in West Vancouver and the benchmark price for a townhouse unit was 45% of the price of a single family house in West Vancouver. 

    2. 15% of the housing units in Cypress Village will be market rental housing. While it is true that market rents are typically higher in West Vancouver than in other communities, rental is still inherently more affordable than strata.

    3.  5% of the units will be below-market rental with the target rental rates being 70% of market rents for similar new units (see Policy 9.1.2 in the Draft Plan). Obligations for the below-market rental housing will be secured through Housing Agreements registered on the titles of residential parcels. The affordable rents are defined in terms of a target compared to market rents for similar new units, not income levels.

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    Thank you for all this work and clearly this is a well thought out plan. I'm curious if there is a rent to buy option planned, and when sales are expected to start on units.

    MattRhodes asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your comments and questions. To answer your first question, Policy 9.1.6 of the Draft Plan notes that “some strata apartment units may be allocated as rent-to-own units.” To answer your second question, BPP as the developer will determine when to offer units to the market. As a ballpark, though, if the Area Development Plan and associated bylaws are adopted this year, it would be reasonable to anticipate that the first buildings could be complete in Cypress Village within about 3 to 5 years from now (likely with sales in advance of that).

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    This is an exciting development for West Vancouver and I see it as also being a destination and not just a neighbourhood. Given the proximity to Cypress Mountain, how is this plan also considering the impacts/need for coordination with the resort.

    Dan asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your comments and question. We agree that Cypress Village provides an exciting opportunity to create a vibrant new place for West Vancouver residents for outdoor recreation and entertainment, with the commercial space including restaurants, cafes, and stores that will meet the needs of Cypress Village residents while also providing an attractive amenity for all residents of West Vancouver. As part of the planning process, the planning team has communicated with representatives of Cypress Mountain and participated in Cypress Liaison meetings (these meetings are organized twice a year by the District and are an opportunity for groups, associations, and organizations with an interest in the Upper Lands to provide updates to each other). The Draft Plan outlines a commitment to a separate, subsequent process towards a broader management plan for the entire mountainside (see Policy 9.5.5 of the Draft Plan) which will consider environmental, cultural, and recreational values as well as collaboration with local First Nations. This process will also include consideration of Cypress Mountain and the resort.

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    In developing a new self sustaining community, as you've outlined, there will be the need for venues for entertainment, restaurants and bars. With some new developments becoming cookie cutter neighbourhoods of chain bars and restaurants like Starbucks, Earls and Cactus Club, can you go into more detail about how you will encourage independent business owners to flourish here? This could include independent or local sports shops (mountain bike, skiing etc). I believe for the Village to have a sense of character and community this is an essential consideration.

    DanL asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your comments. We agree with you that one element of creating a sense of place and character building is having locally-oriented shops and services and restricting large format uses without an active storefront. The zoning and Development Permit guidelines for Cypress Village will ensure that there are opportunities for small cafes and food/beverage operations as well as some larger ones. There is not a legal mechanism that would allow regulation of businesses based on ownership.

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    As a facilities manager (retired) for a major Canadian company, Western Region, my question is about the conveyance of water to the proposed high rises in Cypress Village - i.e. the volume and pressure required to survice these buildings on the mountain, at that altitude. One of Canada's largest condo builders has said recently that it will add a raft of new technologies and systems to future highrise projects to compensate. Are the present systems being utilized adaquate for the site or will the District be responsible for the adjustments and upgrades and thereby increased expense? Thank you.

    Ed R. asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your comments and question. The developer will be responsible for providing adequate on-site and off-site servicing infrastructure to meet the needs of Cypress Village. The Phased Development Agreement will set out servicing standards that the development will be required to meet. Engineering analysis and design have shown that sufficient water and water pressure can be delivered to all proposed buildings.

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    Thank you for this opportunity. In terms of the development potential for Cypress Village, at this point in time, the total number of units is 3711. However, 53 acres of the land in Cypress Village is owned by the District. To the best of your knowledge, has there been any discussion, or have there been any concept plans developed by the District to increase the density still further, so that 3711 units is not the final number? is there a possibility of increased density to say 3800 units, I have heard that number bandied about, or more? This will surely eliminate further the green space and challenge the sustainability of the Village. In terms of green space, are the areas allotted to mountain biking included in the area described as space? Are sports fields included in the calculation of green space?

    TBR asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your comments and questions. As noted in the Draft Area Development Plan for Cypress Village and Eagleridge (see Policy 9.1.1), the total of 3,711 housing units is the maximum permitted for Cypress Village (on lands owned by BPP and by the District) excluding secondary suites in single-family houses and with one other possible exception. When the new fire station and community centre are constructed in Cypress Village, it may be appropriate to include some rental housing. Housing incorporated into the fire station for example, could allow firefighters to live in the community. Any such rental housing will require future rezoning applications, as it would be in addition to the 3,711 units proposed in the current plan. This additional housing would not take up more land, as the purpose-built rental housing would be built on top of the fire station and/or community centre. 

    In terms of the lands to be retained as natural areas in the Cypress Village planning area, the Draft Plan requires that a total of at least 30% of the Cypress Village planning area (i.e. at least 103 acres) will be retained as natural areas. This includes areas for conservation and recreation purposes (including the mountain biking area and sports field). See Section 9.2 of the Draft Plan for more information.

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    It seems that people are already speculating about transferring development potential. "Future development Opportunity" " a chance to purchase acres of undeveloped land in Cypress West...the OCP is discussing concentration of development in this area into higher density, mixed use urban areas" suggesting that the density from Eagleridge will be shifted to areas such as Cypress West, with the property eventually being accessed from the top of Northwoods Drive as well as Eagle lake Road. I understand that this is not imminent but how will this affect affordability? Thank you.

    TBR asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for the comments and question. Transferring the development potential from Eagleridge to Cypress Village and planning for a compact, sustainable new community in Cypress Village will help provide a more diverse and affordable mix of housing than currently exists in West Vancouver. The Draft Plan shifts the form of development from all single-family housing in Cypress Village and Eagleridge to almost entirely multi-family housing in Cypress Village, which is a more affordable form of housing, with some rental and purpose-built affordable rental housing, and no urban development in Eagleridge. See the answer to Question 2 in the Phase 3 FAQs for more information. 

    As background, the long-term vision already contained in the District’s 2018 Official Community Plan is to protect the lands in Eagleridge and Inter Creek in their natural state for recreation and conservation and to create new compact, sustainable neighbourhoods in Cypress Village and Cypress West. The Official Community Plan recommends achieving this vision by transferring the development potential from the lands in Eagleridge and Inter Creek into Cypress Village and Cypress West. As noted in the answer to Question 7 in the Phase 3 FAQs, ‘transferring the development potential’ means protecting the lands in Eagleridge and Inter Creek for recreation and conservation purposes (i.e. they could no longer be developed with single-family housing, which is allowed under the existing zoning, or any form of urban development) and including additional residential development in new neighbourhoods in Cypress Village and Cypress West. This vision in the OCP aims to protect a very large natural area for recreation and conservation, limit suburban sprawl, and concentrate development in a more compact, sustainable way.  

    This current planning and engagement process focuses Eagleridge and Cypress Village. Planning for Inter Creek and Cypress West will happen in a separate process in the future.

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    In relation to municipal infrastructure, staffing and maintenance costs, how much more expensive is it to service a village located on a mountainside compared to an average community in the District? Could the extra servicing demands for a development like Cypress Village (for example, water delivery, snow clearing from streets, maintaining an extra capacity stormwater systems, etc.) be a drain, and have a negative impact, on service delivery and maintenance in other neighbourhoods in District?

    DR asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your comments and questions. A financial impact analysis has been completed and will be included in the supporting package of materials made available when the bylaws are brought forward for Council’s formal consideration of adoption. As noted on page 79 of the Draft Area Development Plan for Cypress Village and Eagleridge, Cypress Village will not have any significant positive or negative financial impact on the taxes and fees paid by other residents and taxpayers in West Vancouver. It is true that servicing construction costs on a site with steep terrain are usually higher than on a site that is level. However, these servicing costs are being paid by the developer and will not affect West Vancouver residents. Some kinds of maintenance (such as snow clearing) will be higher per kilometre in a mountainside location but Cypress Village is a relatively high-density community (compared to much of West Vancouver, which has a high proportion of single-family houses), so the costs per unit are lower than typical in West Vancouver. The property tax and other municipal revenue that will be generated in Cypress Village is more than the extra costs that will be incurred.

Page last updated: 29 Jul 2022, 10:18 AM